Matthias Basedau / Georg Strüver / Johannes Vüllers / Tim Wegenast

Do Religious Factors Impact Armed Conflict? Empirical Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa

GIGA Working Paper, No. 168, June 2011

Abstract
Theoretically, the "mobilization hypothesis" establishes a link between religion and conflict by arguing that religious structures such as overlapping ethnic and religious identities are prone to mobilization; once politicized, escalation to violent conflict becomes likelier. Yet, despite the religious diversity in sub‐Saharan Africa and the religious overtones in a number of African armed conflicts, this assumption has not yet been backed by systematic empirical research on the religion–conflict nexus in the region. The following questions thus remain: Do religious factors significantly impact the onset of (religious) armed conflict? If so, do they follow the logic of the mobilization hypothesis and, if yes, in which way? To answer these questions, this paper draws on a unique data inventory of all sub‐Saharan countries for the period 1990–2008, particularly including data on mobilization‐prone religious structures (e.g. demographic changes, parallel ethno‐religious identities) as well as religious factors indicating actual politicization of religion (e.g. inter‐religious tensions, religious discrimination, incitement by religious leaders). Based on logit regressions, results suggest that religion indeed plays a significant role in African armed conflicts. The findings are compatible with the mobilization hypothesis: Overlaps of religious and ethnic identities and religious dominance are conflict‐prone; religious polarization is conflict‐prone only if combined with religious discrimination and religious tensions.

GIGA-Forschung zum Thema

Related Research Tabs

GIGA AutorInnen

Prof. Dr. Matthias Basedau ist Lead Research Fellow am GIGA Institut für Afrika-Studien und lehrt an der Universität Hamburg. Seine Forschungsgebiete beinhalten Ethnizität, natürliche Ressourcen, politische Institutionen und Religion als Einflussfaktoren für Gewalt und Frieden.

Aktuelle Publikationen der AutorInnen

Matthias Basedau / Simone Gobien / Sebastian Prediger

The Multidimensional Effects of Religion on Socioeconomic Development: A Review of the Empirical Literature

Journal of Economic Surveys, online first, 2018

Matthias Basedau

Does the Success of Institutional Reform Depend on the Depth of Divisions? A Pilot Study on Thirty-Four African Countries

in: Nadine Ansorg / Sabine Kurtenbach (eds.), Institutional Reforms and Peacebuilding: Change, Path-Dependency and Societal Divisions in Post-War Communities, Abingdon/New York: Routledge, 2017, 21-45

Tim Wegenast / Georg Strüver / Juliane Giesen / Mario Krauser

At Africa's Expense? Disaggregating the Social Impact of Chinese Mining Operations

GIGA Working Paper, No. 308, October 2017

Tim Wegenast / Gerald Schneider

Ownership matters: Natural resources property rights and social conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa

Political Geography, 61, 2017, 110-122