Journal

New Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs 2/2019

The new Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs deals, among other things, with the resurgence of ideology in Indonesia, the admission of Timor-Leste to ASEAN, the interests and strategies of the USA and the EU in South East Asia and other topics from the region.

Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs Vol. 38, No. 2 (2019)

Research Articles

  • Diego Fossati: The Resurgence of Ideology in Indonesia: Political Islam, Aliran and Political Behaviour
    Abstract | PDF
  • Paulo Castro Seixas, Nuno Canas Mendes, Nadine Lobner:
    The “Readiness” of Timor-Leste: Narratives about the Admission Procedure to ASEAN
    Abstract | PDF
  • Angela Pennisi di Floristella: United States and European Union Evolving Approaches in Southeast Asia: Moving Closer to Convergence or Divergence?
    Abstract | PDF
  • David Scott: Indonesia Grapples with the Indo-Pacific: Outreach, Strategic Discourse, and Diplomacy
    Abstract | PDF
  • Susan Engel: South–South Cooperation in Southeast Asia: From Bandung and Solidarity to Norms and Rivalry
    Abstract | PDF

Book Reviews

  • Waseem Naser: Book review: Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, and the Malaysian State
    Abstract | PDF

Tabs

Other News

In brief |

Article by Amrita Narlikar, 26 May 2020 – As COVID19 spreads death and destruction, one may well ask the question: will multilateralism be yet another victim of this global pandemic?

Journal |

More democracy in Myanmar? The current special issue of the Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs focuses on the political developments since the beginning of the democratic transformation process in 2011, offering background analyses on topics such as legislative institutionalisation, party structures, and the persistent violence against minorities.

In brief |

On 4 April 2020 the German minister for development cooperation Gerd Müller raised deep concerns that the coronavirus pandemic might lead to hunger, riots, instability, and civil war, especially in Africa. Only days later, UN secretary-general António Guterres warned of grave consequences such as riots, civil wars, and new forms of terrorism. How likely are such worst-case scenarios?