Article

The Real Power of the G-20 - Why the Summit in Hamburg Stood Out

The G20 summit in Hamburg - a landmark moment. GIGA President Prof. Amrita Narlikar shares her analysis in an article in Foreign Affairs online.

At first glance, the recent G-20 summit in Hamburg may have seemed little more than another expensive and pointless diplomatic exercise. The “Leaders’ Declaration,” a document issued at the end of every meeting to set goals and define the lines of collective action, is a compromise text full of banal niceties. The paragraphs on trade are an illustration: the G-20 members promise to “fight protectionism” and yet also acknowledge “the role of legitimate trade defense instruments,” which is essentially a polite nod to the very measures that countries use for protectionism. Climate change is arguably an even bigger disappointment. An agreement among the Group of 20 has now been replaced by a Group of 19+1, in which the outlier position of the United States is essentially legitimized.

With the summit costing the host country at least 130 million euros, German taxpayers are understandably irate about a meeting that they see as having little to no public benefit. Violent protests marred the meeting on a daily basis, and Hamburg has yet to recover from the upheaval. Damaged properties are now being reconstructed and restored, and insurance claims have run into the millions. Citizens of the city were so shaken by what transpired that they now say they never want to host such a summit again. It is therefore worth asking whether any good has come out of this apparent mess. It might seem easy to answer no. But on closer inspection, the answer is an emphatic yes. ...

Read on at foreignaffairs.com

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GIGA Authors

Prof. Dr. Amrita Narlikar is the President of the GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, and Professor of International Relations at the University of Hamburg.

Prior to taking up this appointment, she was Reader in International Political Economy at the University of Cambridge, and the Founding Director of the Centre for Rising Powers. Her research expertise lies in the areas of international trade, rising powers, and multilateral negotiations. She also maintains a strong research interest in India’s foreign policy and economy, Sanskrit, and Indian philosophy.

Recent Publications by the Authors

Johannes Plagemann / Sandra Destradi / Amrita Narlikar (eds.)

India Rising: A Multilayered Analysis of Ideas, Interests, and Institutions

New Delhi: Oxford University Press, Forthcoming

Amrita Narlikar

Reforming the World Trade Organization

2020, Heinrich Böll Stiftung

Amrita Narlikar

The Malaise of Multilateralism and how to manage it

The Raisina Edit 2020, 2020, Observer Research Foundation (ORF)

Amrita Narlikar

Trade multilateralism in crisis: Limitations of current debates on reforming the WTO, and why a game-changer is necessary

in: Teddy Y. Soobramanien / Brendan Vickers / Hilary Enos-Edu (eds.), WTO Reform - Reshaping Global Trade Governance for 21st Century Challenges , London: Commonwealth Secretariat, 2019, 21-31

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