Dr. Jessica Watkins

Associate


  • Short CV

    • Since 08/2021: Associat at the GIGA Institute for Middle East Studies

    • 04/2021 - 08/2021: Research Fellow at the GIGA Institute for Middle East Studies

    • 09/2020 - 05/2021: Guest teacher in International Relations, Department of International Relations, London School of Economics

    • 07/2017 - 03/2021: Postdoctoral Research Officer for the Conflict Research Programme, the Middle East Centre, London School of Economics

    • 2012 - 2013: International Relations Graduate Teaching Assistant, War Studies Department King’s College London

    • 2007 - 2009: Research Assistant, Middle East and North Africa specialising in Iraq, the Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, CA

    • 2002 - 2006: Middle East & North Africa analyst and Arabic linguist, UK government

    • Education: PhD War Studies (Civil policing in Jordan), War Studies Department, King’s College London, UK; M.A. International Relations, War Studies Department, King’s College London, UK; B.A. Hons (Middle Eastern Studies, Arabic with French), University of Cambridge, UK

    Current Research

    • GCC Narratives of World Order

    Countries and Regions

    • The GCC (Saudi, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates)

    • Iraq

    • Jordan

    Dr. Jessica Watkins

    Associate

    jeawatkins@yahoo.com


    Third World Quarterly | 09/2022

    Locating the Local Police in Iraq’s Security Arena: Community Policing, the ‘Three Ps’ and Trust in Ninawa Province

    This paper considers policing in two diverse districts in Ninawa province: a rundown Sunni tribal neighbourhood in Mosul, and a predominantly Christian town in a multi-ethnic district. Our findings suggest that while police conduct does impact how stakeholders view them, public trust in the police is at least as much a function of who the police are as of what they actually do, underscoring that police professionalism cannot substitute for political legitimacy more broadly.

    Peacebuilding | 2022

    Post-ISIL Reconciliation in Iraq and the Local Anatomy of National Grievances: The Case of Yathrib

    The paper uses qualitative interview findings to demonstrate on the one hand that seemingly ‘local’ tribal solutions are built into national-level ‘peace strategies’, while on the other, state capture and power politics is infused into the management of apparently parochial disputes.

    Mustafa Hasan

    Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding | 10/2019

    Combating Domestic Abuse in Jordan from the Top-Down: Liberal and/or Democratic Statebuilding

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